Beyond the Coup in Myanmar: The Other De-Platforming We Should Have Been Talking About

by Jenny Domino “At each of these moments, Facebook took action too late, and too incrementally, to avert harm – harm that the platform knew was imminent and which its very design facilitated. Facebook’s history in Myanmar highlights the broader problems with content moderation in vulnerable contexts, and it should serve as a cautionary lesson to companies that wish to prevent their platforms from facilitating atrocities.” On Feb. 24, 2021, three weeks after Myanmar’s military (the Tatmadaw) staged the coup that changed the course of Myanmar’s future, Facebook announced it was banning all “remaining” military and military-controlled state and media entities from…

Continue Reading Beyond the Coup in Myanmar: The Other De-Platforming We Should Have Been Talking About

The 1989 UP-DND Accord: Content and Context

by Prof. Michael T. Tiu Jr. “The worry that the unilateral abrogation would imperil academic freedom and constitutional rights is not unfounded.” February 2021 marks the 50th anniversary of what we now remember as the “Diliman Commune” — a period spanning the first nine days of February 1971 when students of the University of the Philippines took control of UP Diliman by barricading its entry points and fighting off attempts by the military and police officers to gain access to the campus. It happened during a period of unrest, particularly among the students, academics, and unions of jeepney drivers propelled…

Continue Reading The 1989 UP-DND Accord: Content and Context

Philippines and the United Nations at 75 Years: Past Performance, Future Prospects

by Prof. Andre Palacios “The Philippines was an active participant in the San Francisco Conference 75 years ago. We must continue to be an active participant in defining the UN’s role for the next 75 years. Like with the successful of the Manila Declaration, the Philippines can lead in developing a consensus among states for reshaping the international legal system.” UP Law Assistant Professor Andre Palacios delivered the lecture during the webinar entitled "In Larger Freedoms: 75 Years of the Philippines and the Charter of the United Nations." The event was organized by the Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs to…

Continue Reading Philippines and the United Nations at 75 Years: Past Performance, Future Prospects

The President’s Health: A Duty to Disclose

by Prof. Dante B. Gatmaytan   “It is a ministerial duty on the part of the Office of the President to make the status of the President known to the public. What is discretionary is the manner in which it is to be released.” Professor Dante Gatmaytan discusses his observations and opinion regarding the recent dismissal by the Supreme Court of the case of De Leon v Duterte, where for the first time since 1987, Section 12 of Article VII of the Constitution which provides that "[i]n case of serious illness of the President, the public shall be informed of…

Continue Reading The President’s Health: A Duty to Disclose

The Role of Courts in an Era of Content Moderation

by Jenny Domino It is very likely that social media will serve as the battleground for posts that can run into vaguely worded penal provisions under the [Anti-Terrorism Law], such as the crime of 'inciting to commit terrorism.' This should not be a problem in a rights-respecting democracy; independent courts can make a determination of illegality after observing due process guarantees. As Facebook’s Oversight Board begins to hear cases, do courts have a lesser role to play in resolving questions of speech? This week, Facebook’s Oversight Board has invited public comment for its first batch of content cases. The Board is the…

Continue Reading The Role of Courts in an Era of Content Moderation

When getting ‘91% approval’ means things are really bad

by John Molo 'When you live in a shanty, you are keenly aware how one loose comment can reach the wrong person, and get you kicked out. And that was before the drug war, not to mention the pandemic.' When Pulse Asia released its findings showing that the President had a “91% approval rating,” it received a lot of pushback. Being neither Dilawan nor DDS, I was more surprised about the actual numerical rating than the fact that it was still high. The President remains popular. But a President remaining popular is one thing; getting a “91% approval rating” is…

Continue Reading When getting ‘91% approval’ means things are really bad

End of content

No more pages to load